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Full text of "The Egyptian Problem"

PASSIVE REBELLION
203
promoting or leading this movement or preventing officials or employes by threats of violence from doing their work is liable to severe penalties under Martial Law ;
And whereas the time has now come for the intervention of the Military Authorities in this matter in support of the Civil Administration;
Now I, Edmund Henry Hynman Allenby, by virtue of the powers conferred on me as General Officer Commanding-in-Chief His Majesty's Forces in Egypt, hereby order that all Government officials and employes absent from their duty without leave are to return to their posts forthwith and punctually and efficiently to perform the duties assigned to them.
They will receive no pay for the period of their absence without leave.
Every official or employe who shall not return to his post on the day next following the date of this Proclamation and thereafter punctually perform the duties of such post shall be considered for all purposes as having resigned and his name shall be struck off the list of Government officials.
Every person who by persuasion, threats or violence shall prevent or seek to prevent any person from complying with this Order will be liable to arrest and to prosecution before a Military Court.
The effect was instantaneous, and reinforced the very same day by the announcement that the High Commissioner had received a Note from the American Diplomatic Agency and Consulate - General in Cairo, communicating the recognition of the British Protectorate by President Wilson. The Party of Independence was for the moment staggered by such a blow to all its hopes of support from the Peace Conference. The official strikers realised that, if General Alleaby was determined to put down " passive rebellion " in Cairo as effectively as " active rebellion " had already been suppressed in the provinces, they would be marked men and much more easily brought to account than the political wirepullers of the rising, who had for the most part managed to escape scot-free.
Of all the various strikers, the officials were now the first to resume work. They flocked back to their different Ministries, some with evident alacrity, the majoritym his work in the above circumstances" is committing an offence under the Proclamation above cited and any personrstatement.    The Special